courtney barnett avant gardener genius – Courtney Barnett Covers Loose Tooth’s “Keep On”

Patti Smith will be concluding a five-date Australian tour, and this show is expected to be her last ever in Australia. She will return to play Rock the Garden a second time this year after playing a hard-driving, raucous set in 2015.

courtney barnett depreston guitar – Courtney Barnett (@courtneymelba) On Twitter

COURTNEY BARNETTFuelled by the nimble crunch of her guitar and the loose groove of the rhythm section, Courtney Barnett’s songs are wild and shaggy and wordy, her lyrics plainspoken and delivered like she’s making them up on the spot. The music is rooted in the slack jangle of the late 1980s and the early 1990s, which has prompted the adjective slacker” from journalists and critics around the world. That word is fitting for tunes that sound like they only just roused themselves out of bed. As a description of Barnett’s work ethic and musical influence, however, slacker” is all wrong.


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When Barnett first began attracting attention back in 2013 with two new EPs, the word that people kept using to describe her was ‘mundane’. Not in a pejorative way, either – rather, her music is all about tapping into the doubts and fears that define Gen Y, via everyday tales. A case in point is breakout single “Avant Gardener”, which was about an anxiety-induced panic attack and melds the folkish swell of a Bob Dylan song with the scuzzy chords of Nirvana and a dash of millennial nonchalance.

If you use your browser settings to block all cookies (including essential cookies) please note that you may not be able to access all or parts of this website. Courtney Barnett released two live Vevo videos on Tuesday.

In addition to consistently kicking out top-shelf indie rock, Courtney Barnett runs Milk! Records, a record label focused on promoting musicians from her native Australia and nearby New Zealand. Milk is releasing a compilation next month featuring various artists on the label covering each other’s songs. Naturally, this comp is called Milk On Milk. Artists involved with the project include Tiny Ruins, Jade Imagine, Loose Tooth, Evelyn Ida Morris, the Finks, Hachiku, East Brunswick All Girls Choir, Jen Cloher, and Barnett herself.COURTNEY BARNETT

Born in Melbourne, Barnett attended the Tasmanian School of Art before returning to her hometown to pursue music full-time. After a stint playing with The Dandy Warhol’s Brent DeBoer in a band called Union, she made her EP debut in 2012 with I’ve Got a Friend Called Ferris. She quickly followed up with her full-length debut album How to Carve a Carrot into a Rose, garnering a Best New Music nod from Pitchfork and hitting the road for extensive touring. In late 2013 she caught the eye of Rolling Stone and The New York Times with her performances at the CMJ Music Marathon, with both outlets naming her one of the festival’s standout acts. A bright young talent with a diamond-sharp wit, Barnett has fans eagerly awaiting her next tour dates.

Milk! Records has announced a forthcoming compilation which will feature recordings from the label’s various artists covering each other’s material. Titled, Milk On Milk, the compilation album will arrive on Friday, November 15th, and was previewed on Wednesday with the release of the lead single from Australian rocker Courtney Barnett, who covers Loose Tooth’s Keep On”.

Looks like Courtney Barnett ‘s got something cooking in the kitchen! This week, Barnett shared an intimate, two minute album trailer previewing her upcoming album, and we must say, there’s much to be excited about.

Barnett appears without fanfare. Tonight her band plays Tell Me What You Really Think from start to finish, and in this live setting she is at ease, immersed in her performance. The discomfort snaps back in between songs, so she makes a joke of rushing to the next in order to avoid conversation.

Immediately after landing the punch of I’m Not Your Mother, I’m Not Your Bitch,” Barnett retreats from anything resembling sloganeering, gleefully proclaiming I don’t know anything” on the refrain of Crippling Self Doubt and a General Lack of Confidence.” These are the tensions that animate Tell Me How You Really Feel: clear-eyed engagement with the rotten state of the world versus exhausted detachment, feeling angry versus feeling unwilling to reduce your anger to a cliche, earnestness versus humor, action versus self-awareness. The album’s conflicted sensibility should be familiar to anyone who has attempted to navigate the last several years with their sanity and dignity intact.

It’s hard to imagine a more stellar trajectory than Barnett’s, but she has always been fame’s accidental tourist. Her 2016 debut album, Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit , was a string of worry beads – about social disconnection, overthinking and neighbourly relations – that was nominated for a Grammy and a Brit, and won the Australian Music Prize and four Aria awards in her home country. Put me on a pedestal and I’ll only disappoint you,” she warned in Pedestrian at Best – but that warning fell on deaf ears.

Second time seeing Courtney and she did not disappoint. So cool; she can shred and wail. I love Madison Theater. You can go upstairs and sit down if that is your thing or go down by the stage and mix it up with the young folk.

To celebrate the release of the album and the festive season, the record label are hosting a special Christmas party on December 22. Check out those details, as well as the full album tracklist and Barnett’s cover, below.


Courtney Barnett puts a lot of effort into sounding effortless. Her songs are wild and wooly and wordy, her lyrics plainspoken and delivered like she’s making them up on the spot. From 2012, when Courtney started Milk! Records and released her debut EP and then followed with her second in 2013, she’s received international acclaim taking her and the band, Dave Mudie (drums), Bones Sloane (bass) and Dan Luscombe (guitar) all around the world.

The Australian artist has contributed to ‘Milk On Milk’, a compilation which is being released by the Melbourne label Milk! Records, which Barnett co-founded. The record will see artists from the label’s roster covering one another’s songs.


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Barnett is openly lesbian and was in a relationship with fellow musician Jen Cloher from 2012 to 2018. 52 53 The song “Numbers” was co-written by Barnett and Cloher about their relationship. Barnett’s song “Pickles from the Jar” also details their relationship, and Cloher is mentioned by name in the first line of “Dead Fox”. Barnett admits to Cloher being a “huge constant influence” on her music. 54 Barnett also played guitar in Cloher’s band from 2012 to 2018.

A familiar sentiment, but it rings poignantly coming from Barnett, who’s better known for minor epiphanies about everyday drudgery than she is for broad proclamations about tragic human nature. Tell Me How You Really Feel is both more intimate and more outwardly political, concerning itself with private insecurities and the social ruptures large and small that inevitably result when they are allowed to simmer unchecked for too long. Barnett spends much of the album addressing a terminally anxious you with a mix of plain compassion and frankness bordering on exasperation. At times, she sounds like she’s comforting a close friend or lover. At others, she might be talking to herself.

Courtney Barnett and Kurt Vile will lead an all-star band on a once-in-a-lifetime tour of North America this fall. Watch the video for Courtney Barnett’s cover of Loose Tooth’s Keep On” below. The Coachella lineup announcement is here and we’re pleased to share that Mom + Pop artists Courtney Barnett , DMA’s, and Flume will be taking the stage.

Barnett and her band take the stage in Austin as the sun is going down, in all-black outfits that look a bit like suits of armor. They sound punchier and more ferocious than they do on the record. (A lot of times we record them pretty folky,” Mudie, the drummer, told me earlier in the evening. And then when we play them live, obviously we get a little excited.”) City Looks Pretty,” one of the advance singles, has a new krautrock-ish intro; Charity,” the following song, gets the biggest applause of the night so far, despite being previously unknown to almost everyone in attendance. Barnett’s swaggering stage presence betrays none of her earlier worry. We’re gonna do a set of ‘90s covers. This one’s from 1992,” she deadpans at one point, before starting Avant Gardener.” Given her penchant for resurrecting song fragments from her childhood, I almost believe her for a moment.

Barnett reissued her debut album on pink vinyl in 2016 to raise money for Ten Bands One Cause, an annual fundraiser for Gilda’s Club NYC. The charity offers free support groups, lectures and workshops to cancer patients and their families.

Fuelled by the nimble crunch of her guitar and the loose groove of the rhythm section, Courtney Barnett’s songs are wild and shaggy and wordy, her lyrics plainspoken and delivered like she’s making them up on the spot. The music is rooted in the slack jangle of the late 1980s and the early 1990s, which has prompted the adjective slacker” from journalists and critics around the world. That word is fitting for tunes that sound like they only just roused themselves out of bed. As a description of Barnett’s work ethic and musical influence, however, slacker” is all wrong.

Courtney Barnett has dropped another tune from her upcoming record, Tell Me How You Really Feel, due out on May 18th. The song, titled ” Need a Little Time ,” is accompanied by a colorful, vibrant video directed by none other than Danny Cohen, which depicts Courtney Barnett in a number of surreal scenarios looking slick in a blue jumpsuit.

But seeing her live was a chance for devotees to also witness her guitar prowess. She flexed that muscle all night, offering big, headbanging licks on songs like I’m Not Your Mother…” That one, stationed mid-set, was followed by the bluesy Small Poppies,” and that bled into the pop sensibilities of Elevator Operator.” That trio of songs bridged the full set together by showing her six-stringed versatility. Coupled with her word-skills, its easy to see why Barnett is destined to travel a long and winding road of musical success.

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