leon bridges – river lyrics greek – Leon Bridges Tour Dates 2019 & Concert Tickets

His undeniable skill crafting wholesome soul songs caught the attention of Austin Jenkins of the Austin-based band White Denim over a common appreciation of Wrangler jeans. He’s a songwriter, singer, and a record producer.

leon bridges songs – Leon Bridges Captures The Sound Of The Past, Present, And Future At The Palace

LEON BRIDGESIt’s hard to believe Leon Bridges is only 29 years old. In this retro studio milieu, youthful soul singer Leon Bridges found a path to reinvention and regeneration, trusting Reed’s skills and Elysian Park’s old-school accouterments to create a thoroughly modern recording, Good Thing (Sony).

On this warm April evening, Tony Tasset’s giant Eye sculpture serves as the centerpiece of an extravagant party across the street from The Joule hotel, closing out the weekend of the Dallas Art Fair. Cocktail waitresses in jumpsuits and goggles bounce around couture-adorned art dealers and collectors as they navigate an adult playground replete with a giant swing set. Bridges is the evening’s entertainment, and the whole lavish affair feels like his very own debutant ball. His debut album, Coming Home, will drop in June. No one knew the name Leon Bridges seven months ago, but now everyone expects him to be North Texas’ next big thing, maybe another Norah Jones.

Ambitious and adventurous, Good Thing feels more contemporary and more personal. The multifaceted album includes tender ballads, muscular dance beats, technicolor funk, post-modern pop and a touch of free jazz. The throwback vibe remains, but it’s more elastic and expansive. Bridges” velveteen voice cuts through it all with a ribbon of raw, honest emotion. His sound has advanced forward through the decades, and his fans have come along for the ride. Good Thing peaked at No. 3 on Billboard and has spawned Bridges” most fawning reviews yet. But moving from the singular sound of his megahit debut album to his highly anticipated follow-up challenged the singer to conquer new horizons.

Bridges had no trouble captivating the packed house, keeping the energy high and showing off his impressive dancing skills during uptempo songs. He bounced back and forth across the stage, sometimes dragging his mic stand behind him while he sang, and had no shortage of dance moves in his arsenal to deploy. He worked the crowd like a professional throughout the night, as if he was determined to convince each member of the audience that he wasn’t just a singer but a performer.

Leon Bridges’ first strides as an R&B artist prompted comparisons to legends like Sam Cooke and Otis Redding, but he quickly came into his own as a Top Ten, multiple Grammy-nominated artist. The Eagles added a batch of dates to their ‘Hotel California’ 2020 tour in which they will perform the iconic 1977 album with an orchestra and choir at each stop followed by a set of greatest hits.

Cantalini says he’s not sure how or why Bridges’ song took off. That kind of thing had only happened a couple times in the 10-year history of Gorilla vs. Bear. What was more incredible was that it happened organically, without any support from outside media, to a kid no one had even heard of the day before. That week, Cantalini starting playing the music on his SiriusXM show, and within a couple of weeks, both NPR and the BBC had caught on to Bridges.

On the day I talk to Bridges’ mother, he is performing in Chicago. I ask her if she ever gets worried about him out there on the road, if she’s wary of this world he has entered—the entertainment industry, the whirl of fame, the fashion editors, fawning publicists, the music-hall backstages, all those admiring eyes, what it can do to the soul, how it can slowly eat away at who you really are.

That’s when things got surreal. As promised, the group reconvened in the warehouse for another session in late October, but this time the stakes had changed. People not only knew about the recording session, they wanted to find out what else this reincarnation of Sam Cooke was up to. The band had to keep the sessions on lockdown. On October 29, the Mick Management team—now also representing Bridges—flew into town. The band set up in the bar area of Shipping & Receiving.

Fortress Festival co-founder Alec Jhangiani explains why Bridges was a coveted choice for the marquee act in 2019: “Leon is an inspiration to many people but especially to any creative trying to make it in Fort Worth. He’s demonstrated that hard work, humility and staying true to vision allow one to transcend the conventions of doing something world-class in arts and culture. In other words, you don’t have to be in New York or LA or even Austin. You can stay where you are. You can make the world come to you. We see ourselves working in that tradition, and we’re following his lead to a certain extent. We’ve wanted him on the lineup since year one, and the timing hasn’t worked out before. Now is the perfect time for us and for him, we think.” Bridges will perform on Saturday evening as the festival’s top billing. “We can expect some magic that night,” adds Jhangiani.

I didn’t reach my peak with Coming Home,” Bridges says on the road from Chicago. That sound didn’t define who I am. I had the confidence that I could make an album that you could place next to any major artist and it would be on the same level, and be true to who I am. I felt that Ricky was the guy to bring my sound to where I really wanted it.

Truth be told, it wouldn’t have been a proper Leon Bridges show without a return to the gospel-inspired serenade of River”, which the man and his band busted out as their encore. His 2015 name-making debut, Coming Home, peaked at the sixth spot on U.S. Billboard 200, while also topping the R&B charts both here and in the U.K.

You know you’ve got your hands on a hot ticket when you see fans pleading with clerks under signs that read sold out” hours before a show starts. This was the scene at the Fillmore’s box office on Friday night leading up to Texas soul singer Leon Bridges’ first South Florida gig in three years.


Some people call Bridges a natural. But to understand how this singer was able to perform so well in this unconventional recording session, you have to know that no one who really knows the young man calls him Leon Bridges.

Next up is a West Coast swing that starts in Phoenix on September 4 and includes stops in San Diego, Berkeley, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Seattle, Troutdale and Vancouver. Bridges then hits Missoula ahead of visits to St. Paul, Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, Toronto and Montreal. The tour concludes in the Northeast as Leon follows performances in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. with two nights at Radio City Music Hall in New York City October 5 – 6.

More important than Bridge’s singing, dancing and rock-solid backup band, more important than the jovial sellout crowd at South Florida’s favorite music venue, more important than anything else: This show was a hell of a lot of fun. There’s not much more you could want on a Friday night in Miami Beach, and I have a strong feeling that when Bridges comes back, he’ll be commanding a much bigger venue than the Fillmore. If you weren’t there, you probably missed your last chance to see this ascendent talent at such an intimate venue.


Todd Michael “Leon” Bridges (born July 13, 1989) is an American soul singer, songwriter and record producer from Fort Worth, Texas. He is best known for his song “Coming Home”, which received regular airplay and was also a Top 10 Most Viral Track on Spotify. Bridges’ debut album, also titled Coming Home, was released on June 23, 2015, on Columbia Records and subsequently nominated for Best R&B Album at the 58th Annual Grammy Awards.

Opener ‘Cómo Me Quieres’ sets the tone with its exotic, spacious, slow-motion funk while in antithesis the album’s first single ‘Maria También’ is filled with urgency and attitude. ‘August 10′ is a classic Khruangbin track, infused with their signature bass-heavy sound, while also introducing new elements to their chemistry. There’s time for solid disco-funk in the form of ‘Evan Finds The Third Room’ and the band even finds space to nod to P-Funk with a chant towards the end of the evolving jam ‘Lady and Man’. Closing the album, ‘Friday Morning’ – a song about jumping into love” – skips between laid back Isley Brothers-esque vibes via delicate tempo changes into gentle hymnal passages.

No one could have expected how coolly and calmly Bridges would take the whole thing. Here was this shy kid surrounded by musicians 10 or more years his senior, veterans of countless recording sessions, tours all over the world, and they were playing his songs. Bridges slid into the middle of it, swinging his hands at his sides to the rhythm of his homespun soul songs.

Formed of Laura Lee on bass, Mark Speer on guitar, and Donald DJ” Johnson on drums; Khruangbin’s sounds are rooted in the deepest waters of world music infused with classic soul, dub and psychedelia. Their 2015 debut album ‘The Universe Smiles Upon You’ was heavily influenced by 60’s and 70’s Thai cassettes the band listened to on their long car journeys to rehearsal in the Texan countryside. ‘Con Todo El Mundo’ takes inspiration not just from South East Asia but similarly underdiscovered funk and soul of the Mediterranean and the Middle East, particularly Iran.

As Bridges’ talented band hit the stage fit with multiple guitarists, keys and two of the best backing singers in the business, they started strumming the first notes to If It Feels Good.” Bridges strutted on stage to a resounding ovation as the funk-driven number got everyone immediately on their feet.

Working with Bode herself, Huelster and Bridges fashioned a full corduroy suit covered in drawings representing various aspects of the singer’s life, from his love of Texas (check out the cowgirl) to favorite musicians, his own album artwork and his mother’s name. There’s even a Ford logo — a nod to the first car Bridges bought while working as a dishwasher before he got his start in music.

It’s difficult to put a finger on what makes Leon Bridges’ brand of historicized music so appealing to both listeners and record executives. When you listen to him perform, you can allow yourself to feel transported, to let your imagination drift to a more innocent—perhaps fanciful—moment in America when we all listened to the same music and danced together, with our hips set apart, swaying to the velvety voice of a beautiful young man in a well-pressed, button-down shirt. Not that that combination of visual and musical nostalgia hasn’t won Bridges his detractors.


A rare talent who can do smoldering ballads and elemental rock ‘n’ roll with equal aplomb, soul singer Leon Bridges’ musical aesthetic is nostalgia at its most enthralling. Often compared to soul artists from the 50s and 60s, Bridges’ emphasis on innocent guitar and adept songwriting embrace a subtlety that feels wholly refreshing. Bridges performes songs from his 2015 debut album Coming Home for his first appearance on Austin City Limits.

Even people who know White Denim, a psychedelic-rock act that came out of Austin to achieve some acclaim in the mid-2000s, weren’t aware of the scheme Jenkins and his bandmate, drummer Joshua Block, were hatching. Jenkins had moved back to Fort Worth in 2011, followed by Block a few years later. They had been acquiring vintage equipment—amps, microphones, a hulking soundboard from the 1960s that had been used to record the Grateful Dead—for an ambitious project. They wanted to record an album as albums used to be recorded in the heyday of rock and roll, mostly live on just a handful of tracks, with no overdubbing and little processing.

Good Thing brought Bridges’ particular genre of soul from the past to the present, seamlessly transitioning from the retro-soul throwback of Coming Home to a more unique neo-soul sound that incorporates elements of jazz, R&B and funk. This willingness to venture into new territory bred crossover radio hits like Beyond” and Bad Bad News”, which certainly had something to do with the show selling out well in advance.

From bussing tables at a Tex-Mex restaurant to playing at the White House in under two years, Leon Bridges has no plans to part ways with his humble beginnings. Clad in Western-influenced threads and with a sound reminiscent of ’60s icons Sam Cooke and Otis Redding, he and his band are poised to bring soul into the new century while staying true to their Texan hometown.

Leon Bridges is an American gospel and soul singer from Fort Worth, Texas. Performing to sold-out venues is especially poignant for Bridges, who grew up in a very religious household in Fort Worth, Texas, where he couldn’t play or listen to secular music.

The upbeat numbers were all well-received, but the slower, more introspective and personal tracks got a little lost in the din of the room. Bridges’ individual journey was illuminated in “Georgia to Texas,” with a smoldering “Dazed and Confused”-like arrangement, while his ode to his mother, “Lisa Sawyer,” was dedicated to all the mothers in the room. But though these heartfelt revelations hit hard on record, they didn’t translate on stage, and the energy level sagged.

Ambitious and adventurous, Good Thing feels more contemporary and more personal. The multifaceted album includes tender ballads, muscular dance beats, technicolor funk, post-modern pop and a touch of free jazz. The throwback vibe remains, but it’s more elastic and expansive. Bridges” velveteen voice cuts through it all with a ribbon of raw, honest emotion. His sound has advanced forward through the decades, and his fans have come along for the ride. Good Thing peaked at No. 3 on Billboard and has spawned Bridges” most fawning reviews yet. But moving from the singular sound of his megahit debut album to his highly anticipated follow-up challenged the singer to conquer new horizons.

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